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Judas Priest – Breaking the law – live


Judas Priest are an English heavy metal band formed in Birmingham, England in 1969. Known for twin lead guitars, a wide operatic vocal style, and for introducing the S&M leather-and-studs look into heavy metal, they have sold over 45 million albums worldwide. The band is widely recognised as one of the finest and most original heavy metal bands of all time, with many artists within the genre having cited them as a major influence. MTV ranked them the second “Greatest Metal Band” of all time.

Despite an innovative and pioneering body of work in the late 1970s, the band struggled with indifferently-produced records, repeated changes at the drummer position, and a lack of major commercial success or attention until 1980 when they adopted a more simplified sound on the album British Steel, which helped shoot them to rock superstar status. In 1989, they were named as defendants in an unsuccessful lawsuit alleging that subliminal messages on their albums had caused the suicide attempts of two young men.

The band’s membership has seen much turnover, including a revolving cast of drummers in the 1970s, and the temporary departure of singer Rob Halford in the early 1990s. The current line-up consists of lead vocalist Rob Halford, guitarists Glenn Tipton and Richie Faulkner, bassist Ian Hill, and drummer Scott Travis. The band’s best-selling album is 1982’s Screaming for Vengeance featuring their most commercially successful line-up, featuring Halford, Tipton, Hill, K. K. Downing (guitar), and Dave Holland (drums).

They were a major influence on multiple sub-genres of heavy metal.[citation needed] Their influence, while mainly Rob Halford’s operatic vocal style (widely considered as one of the most unique vocalists in the genre) and the twin guitar sound of K.K. Downing and Glenn Tipton, has been adopted by many bands. Their image of leather, spikes, and other taboo articles of clothing were widely influential during the glam metal era of the 1980s.[7] Their 1980 album, British Steel, has been referred to as the “record that, more than any other, codified what we mean by “heavy metal”.[8] Despite a decline in exposure during the mid 1990s, the band has once again seen a resurgence, including worldwide tours, being inaugural inductees into the VH1 Rock Honors in 2005, receiving a Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance in 2010, and their songs featured in video games such as Guitar Hero and the Rock Band series.
K. K. Downing, Ian Hill, and John Ellis had known each other since early childhood growing up on the Yew Tree estate in West Bromwich. They attended Churchfields Sch. at All Saints in W. Bromwich. Downing and Hill became close friends in their early teens, when they shared similar musical interests (Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Cream, The Yardbirds) and learned to play instruments. The band was founded in October 1970 in Birmingham, West Midlands, England, after a local ensemble named Judas Priest (from Bob Dylan’s song “The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest”[9]) disbanded.

The original Judas Priest had been formed in 1969 by Al Atkins (lead vocals), Bruno Stapenhill (bass, born Brian Stapenhill, in 1948, Stone Cross, W. Bromwich), John Partridge (drums, born c. 1948, W. Bromwich), and John Perry (guitar).[10][11] Stappenhill came up with the name Judas Priest and they rehearsed at his house in Stone Cross. Perry died in a car accident shortly after the band’s formation, and was subsequently replaced by Ernie Chataway (born Ernest Chataway, in 1952, in Winson Green, Birmingham, Warwickshire; died 13 May 2014[12]).

The band played their first gig on 25 November 1969 at The George Hotel in Walsall, Staffordshire and then toured Scotland in December 1969 and January 1970. This band split in April 1970 after their last gig on 20 April at The Youth Centre in Cannock, Staffordshire. Atkins met the next line-up of Judas Priest at a church called St. James in Wednesbury, near W. Bromwich. This place was called Holy Joe’s by the locals and here Atkins met lead guitarist Kenny Downing, bassist Ian ‘Skull’ Hill, and drummer John Ellis (born 19 September 1951, Yew Tree Estate, West Bromwich, Staffordshire). They had a band called Freight (April–October 1970) and were looking for a singer; they agreed to join with Atkins, who suggested using his old band’s name Judas Priest. They rehearsed at Atkins’ mother-in-law’s house in Stone Cross. The new line-up of Atkins, Downing, Hill, and Ellis played their first gig on 16 March 1971 at St John’s Hall, Essington, S. Staffordshire.

With Downing as acting leader, the band moved away from their original blues influences to play hard rock. This quartet played around Birmingham and the surrounding areas with various drummers until 1974, sometimes opening for bands such as Budgie, Thin Lizzy, and Trapeze. Eventually, financial difficulties and problems with their management, Tony Iommi’s company, IMA, led to the departure of Alan Atkins and drummer Alan Moore in May 1973.

At the time, Ian Hill was dating a woman from the nearby town of Walsall who suggested her brother, Rob Halford,[13] be considered as a singer. Halford joined the band, bringing drummer John Hinch from his previous band, Hiroshima. This line-up toured the UK, often supporting Budgie, and even headlining some shows in Norway and Germany.
Rocka Rolla (1974–1975)

Before the band entered the studio to record their first album, their record company suggested they add another musician to the line-up. As Downing was reluctant to incorporate a keyboard or horn player into the band, he chose another lead guitarist, Glenn Tipton in April 1974, from the Stafford-based Flying Hat Band as their new member. The two guitarists worked together to adapt the existing material and Tipton also received credits as a songwriter. In August 1974, the band released their debut single “Rocka Rolla” and followed this a month later with an album of the same name.

Technical problems during the recording contributed to the poor sound quality of the record. Producer Rodger Bain, whose resume included Black Sabbath’s first three albums as well as Budgie’s first album, dominated the production of the album and made decisions with which the band did not agree.[14] Bain also chose to leave fan favourites from the band’s live set, such as “Tyrant”, “Genocide” and “The Ripper”, off the album and he cut the song “Caviar and Meths” from a 10-minute song down to a 2-minute instrumental.

The tour for Rocka Rolla was Judas Priest’s first international tour[15] with dates in Germany, Holland, Norway and Denmark including one show at Hotel Klubben[16] in Tönsberg, one hour from Oslo, Norway which scored them a somewhat negative review in the local press[17] The album flopped upon release, leaving Priest in dire financial straits. Priest attempted to secure a deal with Gull Records to get a monthly pay of 50 pounds, however, because Gull Records were struggling as well, they declined.[18] Rocka Rolla (1974) has been for the most part dismissed by the band and none of its songs were played live after 1976[19] except for Never Satisfied, which was revived during the Epitaph Tour in 2011.[citation needed]
Sad Wings of Destiny (1975–1977)

The band participated more in the production of their next album, recorded during November and December 1975, and chose the producers themselves. The result, Sad Wings of Destiny (1976), included a variety of old material, including the aforementioned stage favourites and immediately shifted the band from a psychedelic sound to straight gritty metal with the opening track, the progressive epic “Victim of Changes”. This song was a combination of “Whiskey Woman”, a stage classic from the Al Atkins’ era of Judas Priest, and “Red Light Lady”, a song that Halford had written with his previous group, Hiroshima. This album and a strong performance at the 1975 Reading Festival helped to raise wider interest in the band and expand their fanbase.[citation needed]
Major label debut (1977–1979)

Their next album, 1977’s Sin After Sin, was the first Priest record under a major label, CBS and the first of the band´s eleven consecutive albums to be certified Gold or higher by the RIAA. With the termination of their contract with their previous label Gull, the band lost the rights to their first two albums. Sin After Sin was produced by ex-Deep Purple bass player Roger Glover. The band chose to use session drummer Simon Phillips for the recordings. He declined to become a permanent member of Judas Priest, so instead Les (James Leslie) Binks played with the band, who were impressed with his performance and asked him to stay. Together they recorded 1978’s Stained Class and Killing Machine (released in America as Hell Bent for Leather). Binks, credited with writing the very powerful “Beyond the Realms of Death”, was an accomplished and technically skilled drummer and his addition added a dexterous edge to the band’s sound. Binks also played on Unleashed in the East (1979), which was recorded live in Japan during the Killing Machine tour. While the first three Judas Priest albums had considerable traces of Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, and Deep Purple in them, as well as ballads, Stained Class did not contain any ballads aside from the very dark “Beyond the Realms of Death.”[citation needed] Killing Machine (released as Hell Bent For Leather in the US) was the first nod to a more commercial sound, with simpler songs that brought back some blues influences. At about the same time, the band members adopted their now-famous “leather-and-studs” image.[7]
Mainstream success (1979–1991)
Judas Priest performing in 1981, during their World Wide Blitz Tour.

Following the release of Killing Machine (1978) was the live release from the supporting tour, entitled Unleashed in the East (1979). It was the first of many Judas Priest albums to go Platinum. At the time, there was some criticism of the band’s use of studio-enhancements and overdubbing in what was marketed as a live album.[20] By this point the playing style of the band had grown progressively heavier, with live versions of songs such as “Exciter” and “Beyond the Realms of Death” sounding much heavier than their studio counterparts.[citation needed]

Les Binks quit in late 1979 as he was unhappy with the band’s desire to move towards a simplified radio rock sound, so they replaced him with Dave Holland, formerly from the band Trapeze. With this line-up, Judas Priest recorded six studio and one live album which garnered different degrees of critical and financial success.

In 1980, the band released British Steel. The songs were shorter and had more mainstream radio hooks, but retained the familiar heavy metal feel. Tracks such as “United”, “Breaking the Law”, and “Living After Midnight” were frequently played on the radio. The next release, 1981’s Point of Entry, followed the same formula, and the tour in support of the album featured new songs such as “Solar Angels” and “Heading Out to the Highway”.

The 1982 album Screaming for Vengeance featured the song “You’ve Got Another Thing Comin'”, which became a major radio hit in the US. Songs such as “Electric Eye” and “Riding on the Wind” also appeared on this album, and proved to be popular live tracks. “(Take These) Chains” (by Bob Halligan, Jr) was released as a single and received heavy airplay. This album went Double Platinum.[21]
Downing and Tipton performing in San Sebastián, Spain, during their World Conqueror Tour of 1984.

Priest continued their success through the mid-1980s. “Freewheel Burning”, released in 1983, was a regular on rock radio. Its album Defenders of the Faith was released the following year. Some critics dubbed it as “Screaming for Vengeance II”, due to its musical similarity to the previous album.[22]

On 13 July 1985, Judas Priest, along with Black Sabbath and other performers, played at Live Aid. The band played at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia. Their setlist was “Living After Midnight”, “The Green Manalishi (With The Two-Pronged Crown)” and “(You’ve Got) Another Thing Comin'”.

Turbo was released in April 1986. The band adopted a more colourful stage look and gave their music a more mainstream feel by adding guitar synthesisers. The album also went Platinum and had a successful tour in support.[quantify] A live album recorded on the tour, titled Priest…Live!, was released the next year, offering fans live tracks from the 1980s era. The video documentary Heavy Metal Parking Lot was created by Jeff Krulik and John Heyn in 1986. It documents the heavy metal fans waiting on 31 May 1986 for a Judas Priest concert (with special guests Dokken) at the Capital Centre (later renamed US Airways Arena) in Landover, Maryland.
Rob Halford in 1988. One of Priest’s trademark stage stunts was to have Halford ride a motorbike on stage.

In May 1988, Ram It Down was released, featuring several reworked songs left over from Turbo, in addition to new songs. A reviewer has called Ram It Down a “stylistic evolution” that resulted from the band’s “…attempt to rid themselves of the tech synthesiser approach…and return to the traditional metal of their fading glory days.” The reviewer argued the album showed “…how far behind they were lagging… the thrashers they helped influence” in earlier years.[23] As well, in the late 1980s, longtime drummer Dave Holland left the band.

In September 1990, the Painkiller album used a new drummer, Scott Travis (formerly from Racer X). This comeback album dropped the 1980s-style synthesisers for all of the songs except “A Touch of Evil”. The tour used bands such as Megadeth, Pantera, Sepultura and Testament as opening bands, and culminated in the Rock in Rio performance in Brazil in front of 100,000+ music fans.

Part of the Judas Priest stage show often featured Rob Halford riding onstage on a Harley-Davidson motorbike, dressed in motorcycle leathers and sunglasses. In a Toronto show in August 1991, Halford was seriously injured as he rode on stage, when he collided with a drum riser that was hidden behind clouds of dry ice mist. Although the show was delayed, he performed the entire set before going to a hospital. Hill later noted “he must have been in agony”. In a 2007 interview Rob later claimed the accident had nothing to do with his departure from the band.[24]
Subliminal message trial

In the summer of 1990, the band was involved in a civil action that alleged they were responsible for the self-inflicted gunshot wounds in 1985 of 20-year-old James Vance and 18-year-old Raymond Belknap in Sparks, Nevada, USA.[25] On 23 December 1985, Vance and Belknap, after hours of drinking beer, smoking marijuana and allegedly listening to Judas Priest, went to a playground at a church in Sparks with a 12-gauge shotgun to end their lives. Belknap was the first to place the shotgun under his chin. He died instantly after pulling the trigger. Vance then shot himself but survived, suffering severe facial injuries. Following numerous complications, Vance too passed away in 1988, three years after the suicide pact.[6]

The men’s parents and their legal team alleged that a subliminal message of “do it” had been included in the Judas Priest song “Better By You, Better Than Me” (a cover of the Spooky Tooth number) from the Stained Class (1978) album. They alleged the command in the song triggered the suicide attempt.[25] The trial lasted from 16 July to 24 August 1990, when the suit was dismissed after the judge ruled that the so-called “do it” message was a result of an accidental mix up of background lyrics.[25] One of the defence witnesses, Dr. Timothy E. Moore, wrote an article for Skeptical Inquirer chronicling the trial.[25] The trial was covered in the 1991 documentary Dream Deceivers: The Story Behind James Vance Vs. Judas Priest.
Halford leaves (1991–1992)

After the end of the Painkiller tour in 1991, Halford left Judas Priest. In September 1991, there were indications of internal tensions within the band. Halford went on to form a street-style thrash metal group named Fight with Scott Travis on drums for the recording sessions. He formed this band due to his desire to explore new musical territory, but due to contractual obligations, he remained with Judas Priest until May 1992.[26]

Halford collaborated with Judas Priest in the release of a compilation album entitled Metal Works ’73-’93 to commemorate their 20th anniversary. He also appeared in a video by the same title, documenting their history, in which his departure from the band was officially announced later that year.

In a 1998 interview on MTV, Halford publicly came out as gay.[27]
Ripper Owens (1996–2003)

Tim “Ripper” Owens, who had previously sung in a Judas Priest tribute band called British Steel, was hired in 1996 as Judas Priest’s new singer. This line-up released two albums, Jugulator (1997) and Demolition (2001), as well as two live double-albums – ’98 Live Meltdown and Live in London (2003), the latter of which had a live DVD counterpart. Although Jugulator sold relatively well, it was given mixed reviews, though it contains the epic “Cathedral Spires”, which became one of Ripper’s more popular songs. Demolition was released in 2001.
Reunion (2003–2006)
The reunited Judas Priest performing in 2005

After eleven years apart, faced with an ever-growing demand for a reunion, Judas Priest and Rob Halford announced they would reunite in July 2003, to coincide with the release of the Metalogy box set (despite Halford’s earlier insistence that he “would never do it”[28]). They did a concert tour in Europe in 2004, and co-headlined the 2004 Ozzfest, being named as the “premier act” by almost all US media coverage of the event. Judas Priest and “Ripper” Owens parted amicably, with Owens joining American heavy metal band Iced Earth.

A new studio album, Angel of Retribution, was released on 1 March 2005 (US) on Sony Music/Epic Records to critical and commercial success. A global tour in support of the album ensued. As for the band Halford, writing for the fourth release was cut off. However, after the Retribution tour in June 2006, Halford announced he would create his own record company, Metal God Entertainment, where he would release all his solo material under his own control. In November 2006 he remastered his back catalogue and released it exclusively through Apple’s iTunes Store. Two new songs allegedly set for the fourth release, “Forgotten Generation” and “Drop Out”, were released through iTunes as well.
VH1 Rock Honors
Judas Priest in typical heavy metal attire performing at the VH1 Rock Honors in Las Vegas on 25 May 2006.

Along with Queen, Kiss and Def Leppard, Judas Priest were the inaugural inductees into the “VH1 Rock Honors”.[29] The ceremony took place 25 May 2006 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and first aired on 31 May 2006.[29] Their presentation was preceded by the band Godsmack performing a medley of “Electric Eye”/”Victim of Changes”/”Hell Bent for Leather”, and Judas Priest themselves played “Breaking the Law”, “The Green Manalishi (With The Two-Pronged Crown)” and “You’ve Got Another Thing Comin'”, before which Halford rode a Harley onstage.
Nostradamus (2006–2010)

In a June 2006 interview with MTV.com, frontman Rob Halford said in regards to the group’s concept album about the 16th-century French writer Nostradamus, “Nostradamus is all about metal, isn’t he? He was an alchemist as well as a seer – a person of extraordinary talent. He had an amazing life that was full of trial and tribulation and joy and sorrow. He’s a very human character and a world-famous individual. You can take his name and translate it into any language and everybody knows about him, and that’s important because we’re dealing with a worldwide audience.”[30] In addition to digging new lyrical ground for the band, the album would contain musical elements which might surprise their fans. “It’s going to have a lot of depth”, Halford said. “There’ll be a lot of symphonic elements. We might orchestrate it, without it being overblown. There may be a massive choir at parts and keyboards will be featured more prominently, whereas they’ve always been in the background before.”[30] The album Nostradamus was released in June 2008; the band began a support tour in that same month.[31]

In early February 2009, the band joined the ranks of bands speaking out against ticket-touting (“scalping”), issuing a statement condemning the practice of selling tickets at well above face value and urging their fans to buy tickets only from official sources.[32] In the same month, Judas Priest continued their tour, bringing their “Priest Feast” (with support from guests Megadeth and Testament) to multiple arenas in England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland in February and March 2009. From there the tour progressed to multiple venues in Sweden. Later in March 2009, Judas Priest performed in Portugal (at Lisbon on the Atlantic Pavilion), which they had not visited since 2005. The tour then continued on to Milan, Italy, and then to Paris, France; Halford had last performed with Judas Priest in Paris in 1991.
Judas Priest headlined the Sweden Rock Festival in June 2008.

From June through August 2009, Judas Priest completed a North American tour to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the release of the album British Steel (1980); the album was performed in its entirety on each tour date, with some other Judas Priest songs thrown into the setlist. This tour was to be a joint effort with fellow Englishman David Coverdale and Whitesnake. Unfortunately, Whitesnake would have to leave the tour after the show in Denver, Colorado on 11 August 2009 due to singer David Coverdale falling ill with a serious throat infection; he was advised to stop singing immediately to avoid permanently damaging his vocal cords.[33][34]

On 14 July 2009, Judas Priest released a new live album, featuring 11 previously unreleased live tracks from the 2005 and 2008 world tours, A Touch of Evil: Live. The performance of “Dissident Aggressor” won the 2010 Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance.[35]

In May 2010, Halford said that the band had been offered a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, but “we’ve just never been there when they wanted to do the ceremony.” He also revealed that a Nostradamus tour is still being contemplated: “We were in Hollywood recently and met with some producers and agents, so there are a lot of things going on behind the scenes.”[36] The Judas Priest song “Electric Eye” was used in the temp score for Toy Story 3[37] but was ultimately replaced by another piece of music.
Downing’s retirement and Epitaph World Tour (2010–2011)

Judas Priest announced on 7 December 2010, that their Epitaph World Tour would be the band’s farewell tour and would run up until 2012.[38] In a January 2011 interview, Rob Halford said about the band’s impending retirement that:

“I think it’s time, you know. We’re not the first band to say farewell, it’s just the way everyone comes to at some point and we’re gonna say a few more things early next year, so I think the main thing that we just want to ask everybody to consider is don’t be sad about this, start celebrating and rejoicing over all the great things we’ve done in Judas Priest.”[39]

Judas Priest on stage in 2011

On 27 January 2011, it was announced that Judas Priest was in the process of writing new material; the band also clarified their plans for the future, saying that “…this is by no means the end of the band. In fact, we are presently writing new material, but we do intend this to be the last major world tour.”[40] Speaking at a press conference in Los Angeles on May, 26, of the new material Glenn Tipton said: “It’s quite a mixed bag. Really, there’s more sentiment on this album. In a way, I suppose, it’s also our farewell album, although it might not be our last one. There are some anthems on there, which pay tribute to our fans”.[41]

On 20 April 2011, it was announced that K. K. Downing had retired from the band and would not complete the Epitaph World Tour. Downing cited differences with the band and management and a breakdown in their relationship. Richie Faulkner, guitarist for Lauren Harris’s band, was announced as his replacement for the Epitaph World Tour.[42] Downing’s retirement leaves bassist Ian Hill as the only remaining founder member of the band.

On 25 May 2011, Judas Priest played during the finale of American Idol season 10 with James Durbin, making it their first live performance without K.K. Downing.[43] The band played a mixture of two songs: “Living After Midnight” and “Breaking the Law”.[43]

On 7 June 2011, the band announced that it planned to release the box set Single Cuts, a collection of singles, later that summer.[44]
Redeemer of Souls and future touring plans (2011-present)
Judas Priest in Redeemer of Souls concert on 9th Oct 2014 at Barclay Center, Brooklyn , New York

In an August 2011 interview with Billboard, Halford explained that he and Tipton “have about 12 or 14 tracks completely mapped out” for a new studio album. He went on to say that four of those were already recorded and mixed, and suggested a new album should be out in 2012.[45] However, the year ended without seeing a release. In another interview with Billboard in August 2012, Halford said that the band is taking its time with the album, and did not give a definite release date, saying “I’m of the attitude it’ll be ready when it’s ready […] I don’t think we’re going to slack off. We’re determined to do a lot of work and be just as dedicated as we’ve always been and take a lot of care and attention with all the songs. We’re not going to just bang this one out, so to speak.”[46]

On 13 September 2011, Priest announced its plans to release a new compilation album, The Chosen Few, a set of Priest songs chosen by other iconic heavy metal musicians.[47] On 5 June 2013, Rob Halford confirmed that the Epitaph World Tour would not be the band’s final tour.[48] On 22 December 2013, Judas Priest released a short Christmas message on their official website, which confirmed that they would be releasing the new album sometime in 2014.[49]

On 5 January 2014, the band appeared in the episode “Steal This Episode” of comedy cartoon show The Simpsons playing the song “Breaking the Law”. Their music was referred to as “death metal”,[50] for which the producers subsequently apologised by having Bart Simpson write “Judas Priest is not ‘Death Metal'” in the opening sequence chalkboard gag.[51]

On 17 March 2014 at the Ronnie James Dio Awards in Los Angeles, California, Rob Halford announced that the new album is finished:

“The Priest album is finished. It’s done. I just heard from the mastering sessions that [guitarist] Glenn [Tipton is] looking over in England, it’s finished. It’s done. It’s coming out at some point. We’ve got some more information we’re about to drop but in the process of the magic of building up expectation and tension to the climax.”[52]

On 28 April 2014, the band released a brand new track for streaming on their official website entitled “Redeemer of Souls”, which is the title track for their upcoming album of the same name.[53]

In an interview given by Eddie Trunk on 5 May 2014, Glenn Tipton says that the band is looking to go back on the road:

“It’s all a little bit ‘play it by ear.’ We’re looking at starting some dates in the fall — exactly how many and what size, what capacity, we’re not sure. But one thing that we have discussed is PRIEST have got such a wealth now of songs behind us, we probably won’t go over the top on production like we’ve done before; the strength will be in the music. That’s our feeling at the moment with this next tour.”[54]

On 20 May 2014, the band confirmed on their official website that they will be playing selected dates in support of their new album Redeemer of Souls.[55]. At the end of June, a 20 date US tour was confirmed for October and November 2014[56]

Redeemer of Souls, sold around 32,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release to land at position No. 6 on The Billboard 200 chart, the band’s highest charting position in the US after the double-disc concept album, “Nostradamus”, debuted at No. 11. This was the band’s first top 10 album in the US.[57]
Musical style and influence
Musical style

Judas Priest’s style has always been rooted in heavy metal, and many of their albums reflect diverse aspects of the genre. For example their first album, Rocka Rolla (1974), is primarily rooted in heavy blues rock. From their album Sad Wings of Destiny (1976) through Stained Class (1978), their style was somewhat progressive, with complex guitar passages, and poetic lyrics. Songs would often shift in dynamics and tempo, and the music was some of the heaviest of its day. This would later have a major influence on progressive metal bands. Judas Priest’s 1977 Sin After Sin introduced the combination of the double bass drum and rapid 16th bass rhythms combined with rapid 16th guitar rhythms that came to define the genre.[58] While the double-bass rhythms from Judas Priest are generally measured and technical, the song “Dissident Aggressor” (1977) pushed this to be an example of the style with an increase in “tempo and aggression” which was later adopted by other bands like Motörhead with a much harder-edged approach.[58] Starting with their fifth album, Killing Machine (1978) (titled Hell Bent for Leather on its release in the US) the band began to incorporate a more commercial, radio-friendly style to their music. The lyrics and music were simplified, and this style prevailed up to their seventh album, Point of Entry (1981). With their eighth album, Screaming for Vengeance (1982), the band incorporated a balance of these two styles. This continued on their next album, Defenders of the Faith (1984). With the follow-up album, Turbo (1986), the band incorporated guitar synthesizers into its signature heavy metal sound. On 1988’s Ram It Down the band retained some of the more commercial qualities of Turbo but also returned to some of the fast tempo heavy metal found on their earlier works. This fast-tempo style continued with 1990’s Painkiller. Jugulator (1997) tried to incorporate some of the 1990s contemporary groove metal styles. For Demolition (2001), the album has a more traditional heavy metal sound. Following the return of Rob Halford for Angel of Retribution and Nostradamus, the band returned to the style that it had on its early albums.[1]
Media recognition

Judas Priest have influenced a great deal of metal music since the late-mid 70s. They were ranked by MTV as the second “Greatest Metal Band” of all time (after Black Sabbath), and VH1 named them the 78th greatest artist of all time in 2010.[5]
Fashion

In addition to the sound, Judas Priest are also known for being revolutionaries in heavy metal fashion.[7] Rob Halford thus began incorporating a macho image of what today is known as hardcore metal/biker/S&M style into his look as early as 1978 (to coincide with the release of their album Killing Machine), and the rest of the band followed. It became a mainstay in heavy metal; soon, several other bands, particularly of the NWOBHM and early black metal movements, began incorporating Halford’s fashion into their look as well.[59] This sparked a revival in metal in the early ’80s, and catapulted them to fame, in both the mainstream and underground. Even in the present, it is not uncommon to find metal artists sporting such a look at concerts.

Their popularity and status as one of the exemplary and influential heavy metal bands has earned them the nickname “Metal Gods” from their song of the same name.[60]
Personnel
Main article: List of Judas Priest band members

Current members

Ian Hill – bass (1970–present)
Rob Halford – vocals (1973–1992, 2003–present)
Glenn Tipton – guitars, keyboards, synthesiser (1974–present)
Scott Travis – drums, percussion (1989–present)
Richie Faulkner – guitars (2011–present)

Fast car -Tracy Chapman – Live


Tracy Chapman (born March 30, 1964) is  known for her hits “Fast Car” and “Give Me One Reason”, along with other singles “Talkin’ ’bout a Revolution”, “Baby Can I Hold You”, “Crossroads”, “New Beginning” and “Telling Stories”. She is a multi-platinum and four-time Grammy Award-winning artist.

Elektra released her critically acclaimed, multi-million selling debut album in 1988. The album garnered Chapman six Grammy nominations, including Album of the Year, three of which she won, including Best Female Pop Vocal Performance for her single “Fast Car”. Since then, Chapman has furthered her success with seven more studio albums, which includes her also multi-million selling fourth album New Beginning, which garnered her a fourth Grammy award, for Best Rock Song, for “Give Me One Reason”. Chapman’s latest release is 2008’s Our Bright Future.
Chapman was born in Cleveland, Ohio. She was raised by her mother, who recognized Tracy’s love of music and, despite not having much money, bought her a ukulele when she was just three. Chapman began playing guitar and writing songs at the age of eight. She says that she may have been first inspired to play the guitar by the television show Hee Haw.

Raised Baptist, Chapman attended an Episcopal high school.She was accepted into the program “A Better Chance”, which helps minority students attend private schools. She graduated from Wooster School in Connecticut, then attended Tufts University. She graduated with a B.A. degree in anthropology and African studies.
Career

During college, Chapman began busking in Harvard Square and playing guitar in Club Passim, the Nameless Coffeehouse, and other coffeehouses in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Another Tufts student, Brian Koppelman, heard Chapman playing and brought her to the attention of his father, Charles Koppelman. Koppelman, who ran SBK Publishing, signed Chapman in 1986. After Chapman graduated from Tufts in 1987, he helped her to sign a contract with Elektra Records.
Chapman playing in Budapest, Hungary,in 1988.

At Elektra, she released Tracy Chapman (1988). The album was critically acclaimed, and she began touring and building a fanbase. “Fast Car” began its rise on the US charts soon after she performed it at the televised Nelson Mandela 70th Birthday Tribute concert in June 1988; it became a number 6 pop hit on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending August 27, 1988. Rolling Stone ranked the song number 167 on their 2010 list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”. It is the highest-ranking song both written and performed by a female performer. “Talkin’ ’bout a Revolution”, the follow-up, charted at number 75 and was followed by “Baby Can I Hold You”, which peaked at number 48. The album sold well, going multi-platinum and winning three Grammy Awards, including an honor for Chapman as Best New Artist. Later in 1988, Chapman was a featured performer on the worldwide Amnesty International Human Rights Now! Tour. According to the VH1 website, “Her album helped usher in the era of political correctness—along with 10,000 Maniacs and R.E.M., Chapman’s liberal politics proved enormously influential on American college campuses in the late ’80s.”
Her follow-up album Crossroads (1989) was less commercially successful, but still achieved platinum status. By 1992’s Matters of the Heart, Chapman was playing to a small and devoted audience. Her fourth album New Beginning (1995) proved successful, selling over three million copies in the U.S. The album included the hit single “Give Me One Reason”, which won the 1997 Grammy for Best Rock Song and became Chapman’s most successful single to date, peaking at Number 3 on the Billboard Hot 100. Following a four-year hiatus, her fifth album, Telling Stories, was released in 2000. Its hit single, “Telling Stories”, received heavy airplay on European radio stations and on Adult Alternative and Hot AC stations in the United States. Chapman toured Europe and the US in 2003 in support of her sixth album, Let It Rain (2002).

To support her seventh studio album, Where You Live (2005), Chapman toured major US cities in October and throughout Europe over the remainder of the year. The “Where You Live” tour was extended into 2006; the 28-date European tour featured summer concerts in Germany, Italy, France, Sweden, Finland, Norway, the UK, Russia and more. On June 5, 2006, she performed at the 5th Gala of Jazz in Lincoln Center, New York, and in a session at the 2007 TED (Technology Entertainment Design) conference in Monterey, California.

Chapman was commissioned by the American Conservatory Theater to compose music for its production of Athol Fugard’s Blood Knot, a play on apartheid in South Africa, staged in early 2008.[8]

Atlantic Records released Chapman’s eighth studio album, Our Bright Future (2008).[9] Chapman made a 26-date solo tour of Europe. She returned to tour Europe and selected North American cities during the summer of 2009. She was backed by Joe Gore on guitars, Patrick Warren on keyboards, and Dawn Richardson on percussion.[10]

Chapman was appointed a member of the 2014 Sundance Film Festival U.S. Documentary jury.[11]
Social activism

Chapman is widely regarded as a politically and socially active musician. In a 2009 interview with American radio network NPR, she is quoted as saying: “I’m approached by lots of organizations and lots of people who want me to support their various charitable efforts in some way. And I look at those requests and I basically try to do what I can. And I have certain interests of my own, generally an interest in human rights.”[3] This interest in human rights can be seen lyrically in her music. Songs such as 1988’s “Talkin’ ‘Bout a Revolution” highlight the importance of speaking up against injustice:

Don’t you know, talking ’bout a revolution sounds like a whisper / when they’re standing in the welfare lines.

Chapman’s song “Fast Car” also brings awareness to the struggles of poverty, with lyrics such as:

I know things will get better / you’ll find work and I’ll get promoted / we’ll move out of the shelter / buy a bigger house and live in the suburbs

Chapman’s activism extends further than her lyrics. She has performed at numerous socially aware events, and continues to do so. In 1988, she performed in London as part of a worldwide concert tour to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights with Amnesty International.[12] The same year Chapman also performed in the Nelson Mandela 70th Birthday Tribute, an event which raised money for South Africa’s Anti-Apartheid Movement and seven children’s charities.[13] More recently, in 2004 Chapman performed (and rode) in the AIDSLifeCycle event.[14]

Chapman has also been involved with Cleveland’s elementary schools. A music video produced by Chapman that highlights significant achievements in African-American history has become an important teaching tool in Cleveland Public Schools. Chapman also agreed to sponsor a “Crossroads in Black History” essay contest for high school students in Cleveland and other cities.[15]

In 2004, Chapman was given an honorary doctorate in Fine Arts by her alma mater, Tufts University, recognizing her commitment to social activism.[16]

I’m fortunate that I’ve been able to do my work and be involved in certain organizations, certain endeavors, and offered some assistance in some way. Whether that is about raising money or helping to raise awareness, just being another body to show some force and conviction for a particular idea. Finding out where the need is – and if someone thinks you’re going to be helpful, then helping.
—Tracy Chapman[17]

Chapman often performs at and attends charity events such as Make Poverty History, amfAR and AIDS/LifeCycle, to support social causes. She identifies as a feminist.[18]
Personal life

Although Chapman has never disclosed her sexual orientation, in the mid-1990s she dated writer Alice Walker.[19] Chapman maintains a strong separation between her personal and professional lives. “I have a public life that’s my work life and I have my personal life,” she said. “In some ways, the decision to keep the two things separate relates to the work I do.tracy chapman

AC/DC – Rock N Roll Train – Live


AC/DC are an Australian hard rock band, formed in November 1973 by brothers Malcolm and Angus Young, who remained constant members until Malcolm’s departure in 2014. Commonly referred to as a hard rock or blues rock band, they are also considered pioneers of heavy metal and are sometimes classified as such, though they have always dubbed their music as simply “rock and roll“. To date they are one of the highest-grossing bands of all time.

AC/DC underwent several line-up changes before releasing their first album, High Voltage, on 17 February 1975 with guitarist Angus Young being the only original member left in the band. Membership subsequently stabilised until bassist Mark Evans was replaced by Cliff Williams in 1977 for the album Powerage. Within months of recording the album Highway to Hell, lead singer and co-songwriter Bon Scott died on 19 February 1980 after a night of heavy alcohol consumption. The group considered disbanding, but buoyed by support from Scott’s parents, decided to continue and set about finding a new vocalist. Ex-Geordie singer Brian Johnson was auditioned and selected to replace Scott. Later that year, the band released the new album, Back in Black, which was made as a tribute to Bon Scott. The album launched them to new heights of success and became their all time best-seller, selling over 10,000 copies a day in its first week.

The band’s next album, For Those About to Rock We Salute You, was their first album to reach number one in the United States. AC/DC declined in popularity soon after drummer Phil Rudd was fired in 1983 and was replaced by future Dio drummer Simon Wright. The band experienced a resurgence in the early 1990s with the release of The Razors Edge. Phil Rudd returned in 1994 after Chris Slade, who was with the band from 1989 to 1994, was asked to leave in favour of him, and contributed to the band’s 1995 album Ballbreaker. Since then, the band’s line-up has remained the same. Stiff Upper Lip was released in 2000 and was well received by critics, and the band’s latest studio album, Black Ice, was released on 20 October 2008 and was the second-highest-selling album of that year. It was their biggest hit on the charts since For Those About to Rock, eventually reaching No.1 on all charts worldwide.[6]

AC/DC had sold more than 200 million records worldwide, including 71.5 million albums in the United States alone, making them the tenth-best-selling band in the United States and one of the world’s best-selling bands of all time.[7][8][9] Back in Black has sold an estimated 50 million units worldwide, making it the fifth-highest-selling album by any artist – and the third-highest-selling album by any band. The album has sold 22 million units in the US alone, where it is the sixth-highest-selling album of all time.[10] AC/DC ranked fourth on VH1’s list of the “100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock”[11][12] and were named the seventh “Greatest Heavy Metal Band of All Time” by MTV.[13] In 2004, AC/DC ranked No. 72 on the Rolling Stone list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time”.[14] Producer Rick Rubin, who wrote an essay on the band for the Rolling Stone list, referred to AC/DC as “the greatest rock and roll band of all time.”[14] In 2010, AC/DC were ranked number 23 in the VH1 list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time”.[15]
Brothers Malcolm, Angus, and George Young were born in Glasgow, Scotland, and moved to Sydney with most of their family in 1963. George was the first to learn to play the guitar. He became a member of the Easybeats, one of Australia’s most successful bands of the 1960s. In 1966, they became the first local rock act to have an international hit, with the song “Friday on My Mind”.[16] Malcolm followed in George’s footsteps by playing with a Newcastle, New South Wales band called the Velvet Underground (not to be confused with the New York-based Velvet Underground).[17] Their oldest brother Alex Young chose to remain in Britain to pursue musical interests. In 1967, Alexander formed and played bass in the London-based band Grapefruit—initially called “The Grapefruit”—with three former members of Tony Rivers and the Castaways, John Perry, Geoff Swettenham, and Pete Swettenham.
The band’s logo was designed in 1977 by Gerard Huerta, commissioned by Bob Defrin, the art director at Atlantic Records during the 1970s. It first appeared on the international version of Let There Be Rock.

Malcolm and Angus Young developed the idea for the band’s name after their sister, Margaret Young, saw the initials “AC/DC” on a sewing machine. “AC/DC” is an abbreviation meaning “alternating current/direct current” electricity. The brothers felt that this name symbolised the band’s raw energy, power-driven performances of their music.[18][19] “AC/DC” is pronounced one letter at a time, though the band are colloquially known as “Acca Dacca” in Australia.[20][21] The AC/DC band name is stylised with a lightning bolt separating the ‘AC’ and ‘DC’ and has been used on all studio albums with the exception of Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap.[22]
Early years

In November 1973 Malcolm and Angus Young formed AC/DC and recruited bassist Larry Van Kriedt, vocalist Dave Evans, and Colin Burgess, ex-Masters Apprentices drummer.[23] Pushing hard for the band’s success were Australia’s legendary roadie Ray Arnold and his partner Alan Kissack. Gene Pierson booked the band to let the band play at Bondi Lifesaver on New Year’s Eve, 1973.[24]

By this time, Angus Young had adopted his characteristic school-uniform stage outfit. The idea was his sister Margaret’s. Angus had tried other costumes: Spider-Man, Zorro, a gorilla, and a parody of Superman, named Super-Ang.[17] In its early days, most members of the band dressed in some form of glam or satin outfit but this approach was abandoned seeing as Melbourne band Skyhooks had already adopted this approach to their stage presentation.

The Young brothers decided that Evans was not a suitable frontman for the group because they felt he was more of a glam rocker like Gary Glitter.[25] On stage, Evans was occasionally replaced by the band’s first manager, Dennis Laughlin, who was the original lead singer with Sherbet prior to Daryl Braithwaite. Evans did not get along with Laughlin, which also contributed to the band’s ill feeling toward Evans.[25]
The Bon Scott era (1974–80)
The journey begins (1974–77)

In September 1974 Ronald Belford “Bon” Scott, an experienced vocalist and friend of George Young, replaced Dave Evans[26] after friend Vince Lovegrove recommended him to George Young.[5] Like the Young brothers, Scott had been born in Scotland before emigrating to Australia in his childhood. The band had recorded only one single with Evans, “Can I Sit Next To You, Girl” / “Rockin’ in the Parlour”; eventually, the song was re-written and re-recorded with Bon Scott as “Can I Sit Next to You Girl” [Track 7 on the Australian album T.N.T. (1975), and Track 6 on the international release of High Voltage (1976)].

“It’s a Long Way to the Top” (1975)
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The second single of High Voltage demonstrates a combination of bagpipes with more traditional rock instruments while the lyrics discuss the perils of being in a rock band.
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By October 1974, the Australia-only album High Voltage had been recorded. It took only ten days[27] and was based on instrumental songs written by the Young brothers, with lyrics added by Scott. Within a few months, the band’s line-up had stabilised, featuring Scott, the Young brothers, bassist Mark Evans and drummer Phil Rudd. Later that year they released the single “It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll)”, which became their perennial rock anthem.[28] It was included on their second album, T.N.T. (1975), which was also released only in Australia and New Zealand. T.N.T. featured the song “High Voltage”, which was the first song written and recorded for the album. Because “High Voltage” was released as a single before T.N.T. was released, some people thought it was the title track to AC/DC’s debut album.

Between 1974 and 1977, aided by regular appearances on Molly Meldrum’s Countdown, the ABC’s nationally broadcast pop-music television show, AC/DC became one of the most popular and successful acts in Australia. Their performance on 3 April 1977 was their last live TV appearance for more than 20 years.[27]
International success (1976–80)
Former vocalist Bon Scott (centre) pictured with guitarist Angus Young (left) and bassist Cliff Williams (back), performing at the Ulster Hall in August 1979

In 1976, the band signed an international deal with Atlantic Records and toured extensively throughout Europe, including their first UK tour sponsored by Sounds magazine, called the ‘Lock Up Your Daughters Summer Tour’. They gained invaluable experience of the stadium circuit, supporting leading rock acts such as Black Sabbath, Aerosmith, Kiss, Styx, UFO, and Blue Öyster Cult, and co-headlined with Cheap Trick.[27]

The first AC/DC album to gain worldwide distribution was a 1976 compilation of tracks taken from the High Voltage and T.N.T. LPs. Also titled High Voltage, and released on the Atlantic Records label, the album, which has to date sold three million copies worldwide,[29] gained the band a following among the then-substantial British punk audience.[30] The track selection was heavily weighted toward the more recent T.N.T., and included only two songs from their first LP. The band’s next album, Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, was released in the same year in both Australian and international versions, like its predecessor. Track listings varied worldwide, and the international version of the album also featured the T.N.T. track “Rocker”, which had previously never been released internationally. The original Australian version included “Jailbreak” (now more readily available on the 1984 compilation EP ’74 Jailbreak or as a live version on the 1992 Live album). Dirty Deeds was not released in the US until 1981, by which time the band were at the peak of their popularity.

Following the 1977 recording Let There Be Rock, bassist Mark Evans was sacked; purportedly to find someone who could sing backup vocals.[5] Evans described disagreement with Angus and Malcolm as a contributing factor.[5] He was replaced by Cliff Williams.[5] Neither of the Young brothers has elaborated on the departure of Evans, though Richard Griffiths, the CEO of Epic Records and a booking agent for AC/DC in the mid-1970s, later commented, “You knew Mark wasn’t going to last, he was just too much of a nice guy.”[17] Mark Evans’ autobiography, DIRTY DEEDS: My Life Inside/Outside of AC/DC, released in 2011, predominantly dealt with his time in AC/DC, including being fired.[31]
Bronze statue of Bon Scott, unveiled in Fremantle, Western Australia, in October 2008

AC/DC were a somewhat formative influence on New Wave of British Heavy Metal bands who emerged in the late 1970s, such as Saxon and Iron Maiden, in part as a reaction to the decline of traditional early 1970s hard rock bands. In 2007, critics noted that AC/DC, along with Thin Lizzy, UFO, Scorpions and Judas Priest, were among “the second generation of rising stars ready to step into the breach as the old guard waned.”[32]

AC/DC’s first American exposure was through the Michigan radio station AM 600 WTAC in 1977. The station’s manager, Peter C. Cavanaugh, booked the band to play at Flint’s Capitol Theater. The supporting act was MC5, who had just briefly reunited and agreed to play at the event. The band opened with their popular song “Live Wire” and closed with “It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll)”.[33]

AC/DC came to be identified with the punk rock movement by the British press. Their reputation, however, managed to survive the punk upheavals of the late 1970s, and they maintained a cult following in the UK throughout this time.[4] Angus Young gained notoriety for mooning the audience during live performances.

The 1978 release of Powerage marked the debut of bassist Cliff Williams, and with its harder riffs, followed the blueprint set by Let There Be Rock.[34] Only one single was released from Powerage, “Rock ‘n’ Roll Damnation/Sin City”. Eddie Van Halen notes this to be his favourite AC/DC record, along with Highway to Hell.[35] An appearance at the Apollo Theatre, Glasgow during the Powerage tour was recorded and released as If You Want Blood You’ve Got It, featuring such songs as “Whole Lotta Rosie”, “Problem Child”, and “Let There Be Rock”, as well as lesser-known album tracks like “Riff Raff”. Powerage was the last album produced by Harry Vanda and George Young that had lead vocals by Bon Scott, and is claimed to be AC/DC’s most under-rated album.[36]

The major breakthrough in the band’s career came in their collaboration with producer “Mutt” Lange on the album Highway to Hell, released in 1979. It became the first AC/DC LP to break into the US top 100, eventually reaching No. 17,[27] and it propelled AC/DC into the top ranks of hard rock acts.[4] Highway to Hell had lyrics that shifted away from flippant and comical toward more central rock themes, putting increased emphasis on backing vocals but still featured AC/DC’s signature sound: loud, simple, pounding riffs and grooving backbeats.[37] The final track, “Night Prowler”, has two breaths in quick succession at the start of the song, intended to create a tone of fear and loathing.[4]
Scott’s death (1980)

As 1980 began, the band began work on a new album that would eventually become Back in Black, but Bon Scott would not live to see it finished. On 19 February 1980, Scott passed out in the car on the way back to friend Alistair Kinnear’s house after a night of heavy drinking at the Music Machine club in London. Upon arrival at his home, Kinnear was unable to move Scott from the car into his home for the night, so he left him in the car overnight to sleep off the effects of the alcohol. Unable to wake Scott late the next morning, Kinnear rushed him to King’s College Hospital in Camberwell, where Scott was pronounced dead on arrival. Pulmonary aspiration of vomit was the cause of Scott’s death,[38] and the official cause was listed as “acute alcohol poisoning”.[39] Scott’s family buried him in Fremantle, Western Australia, the area they emigrated to when he was a boy.[40]

Inconsistencies in the official accounts of Scott’s death have been cited in conspiracy theories, which suggest that Scott died of a heroin overdose, or was killed by exhaust fumes redirected into the car, or that Kinnear did not exist.[39] Additionally, Scott was asthmatic,[41] and the temperature was below freezing on the morning of his death.
The Brian Johnson era (1980–present)
The rebirth (1980–83)
Brian Johnson Live with AC/DC in 2008

Following Scott’s death the band briefly considered quitting, but encouraged by the insistence from Scott’s parents that he would have wanted them to go on, they eventually decided to continue and went about finding a new frontman.[5] Various candidates were considered for his replacement, including: Buzz Shearman, ex-Moxy member, who was not able to join because of voice problems,[42] ex-Back Street Crawler vocalist Terry Slesser and then Slade vocalist, Noddy Holder.[43] The remaining AC/DC members finally decided on ex-Geordie singer Brian Johnson.
Cliff Williams in 1981 during the For Those About to Rock Tour

Angus Young later recalled, “I remember the first time I had ever heard Brian’s (Johnson) name was from Bon. Bon had mentioned that he had been in England once touring with a band and he had mentioned that Brian had been in a band called Geordie and Bon had said ‘Brian Johnson, he was a great rock and roll singer in the style of Little Richard.’ And that was Bon’s big idol, Little Richard. I think when he saw Brian at that time, to Bon it was ‘Well he’s a guy that knows what rock and roll is all about.’ He mentioned that to us in Australia. I suppose when we decided to continue, Brian was the first name that Malcolm and myself came up with, so we said we should see if we can find him.”[44] For the audition, Johnson sang “Whole Lotta Rosie” from Let There Be Rock and Ike & Tina Turner’s “Nutbush City Limits”.[19] He was hired a few days after the audition.

With Brian Johnson the band completed the songwriting that they had begun with Bon for the album Back in Black. Recording took place at Compass Point Studios in The Bahamas a few months after Scott’s death. Back in Black, produced by Mutt Lange and recorded by Tony Platt, became their biggest-selling album and a hard-rock landmark; hits include “Hells Bells”, “You Shook Me All Night Long”, “Rock and Roll Ain’t Noise Pollution” and the title track. The album reached No.1 in the UK and No.4 in the US, where it spent 131 weeks on the Billboard 200 album chart.[27]

The follow-up album, 1981’s For Those About to Rock We Salute You, also sold well and was positively received by critics. The album featured two of the band’s most popular singles: “Let’s Get It Up”[45] and the title track, “For Those About to Rock (We Salute You)”, which reached No.13 and No.15 in the UK, respectively. The band split with Lange for their self-produced 1983 album, Flick of the Switch, in an effort to recover the rawness and simplicity of their early albums.[46]
Departure of Rudd and commercial decline (1983–87)

“Back in Black” (1980)
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“Back in Black”‘s riff is one of the most recognised in hard rock history.[47] The song ranked No.187 on Rolling Stone ‘s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and reached No.37 in the US.
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After having problems with drugs and alcohol,[48] drummer Phil Rudd’s friendship with Malcolm Young deteriorated and eventually escalated to a physical confrontation after which Rudd was fired.[19] Session drummer B.J. Wilson was drafted in to help complete the recordings, but his drum parts were eventually not used, as Rudd had already completed his drum parts.[49] Rudd was replaced by Simon Wright in the summer of 1983 after the band held over 700 auditions in the US and UK.[50] Simon Kirke of Free and Bad Company fame, and Paul Thompson of Roxy Music were two of the drummers auditioned.[51]

Later in the year, AC/DC released the self-produced album Flick of the Switch, which was less successful than their previous albums, and was considered underdeveloped and unmemorable.[46] One critic stated that the band “had made the same album nine times”.[52] AC/DC were voted the eighth-biggest disappointment of the year in the 1984 Kerrang! readers’ poll. However, Flick of the Switch eventually reached No.4 on the UK charts,[19] and AC/DC had minor success with the singles “Nervous Shakedown” and “Flick of the Switch”. Fly on the Wall, produced by the Young brothers in 1985, was also regarded as uninspired and directionless.[53] A music concept video of the same name featured the band at a bar, playing five of the album’s ten songs.

In 1986, the group returned to the charts with the made-for-radio “Who Made Who”. The album Who Made Who was the soundtrack to Stephen King’s film Maximum Overdrive,[36] It brought together older hits, such as “You Shook Me All Night Long” and “Ride On”, with newer songs such as title track “Who Made Who”, and two new instrumentals, “D.T.” and “Chase the Ace”.

In February 1988, AC/DC were inducted into the Australian Recording Industry Association’s Hall of Fame.[54]
Back to commercial success (1987–90)

AC/DC’s 1988 album, Blow Up Your Video, was recorded at Studio Miraval in Le Val (Occitania), France, and reunited the band with their original producers, Harry Vanda and George Young. The group recorded nineteen songs, choosing ten for the final release; though the album was later criticised for containing excessive “filler”,[55] it was a commercial success. Blow Up Your Video sold more copies than the previous two studio releases combined, reaching No.2 on the UK charts—AC/DC’s highest position since “Back in Black” in 1980. The album featured the UK top-twenty single “Heatseeker”[45] and popular songs such as “That’s the Way I Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll”. The Blow Up Your Video World Tour began in February 1988, in Perth, Australia. That April, following live appearances across Europe, Malcolm Young announced that he was taking time off from touring, principally to begin recovery from his alcoholism. Another member of the Young family, Stevie Young, temporarily took Malcolm’s place.
Phil Rudd performs at the KeyArena in Seattle on 12 August 1996 during the Ballbreaker World Tour

Following the tour, Wright left the group to work on the upcoming Dio album Lock Up the Wolves, and was replaced by session veteran Chris Slade. Johnson was unavailable for several months while finalising his divorce,[19] so the Young brothers wrote all the songs for the next album, a practice they continued for all subsequent releases through Black Ice in 2008.
Popularity regained (1990–1994)

The next album, The Razors Edge, was recorded in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, and was mixed and engineered by Mike Fraser and produced by Bruce Fairbairn, who had previously worked with Aerosmith and Bon Jovi. Released in 1990, it was a major comeback for the band, and included the hits “Thunderstruck” and “Are You Ready”, which reached No.5 and No.16 respectively on Billboards Mainstream Rock Tracks Chart, and Moneytalks, which peaked at No.23 on the Billboard Hot 100.[45] The album went multi-platinum and reached the US top ten. Several shows on the Razors Edge tour were recorded for the 1992 live album, titled Live. Live was produced by Fairbairn, and is considered one of the best live albums of the 1990s.[56] AC/DC headlined the Monsters of Rock show during this tour, which was released on DVD as Live at Donington. During The Razors Edge tour three fans were killed at a concert at the Salt Palace in Salt Lake City, Utah in January 1991. When the concert began fans rushed the stage crushing the three and injuring others. It took 20 minutes before venue security and the group understood the severity of the situation and stopped the concert. AC/DC settled with the victims’ families out of court. As a result of this incident, the Salt Palace eliminated festival seating from future events.[57][58] A year later, AC/DC recorded “Big Gun” for the soundtrack of the Arnold Schwarzenegger movie Last Action Hero, and was released as a single, reaching No.1 on the US Mainstream Rock chart, the band’s first No.1 single on that chart.[27]
Popularity confirmed (1994–2008)

In 1994, Angus and Malcolm invited Rudd to several jam sessions. He was eventually rehired to replace Slade, whose amicable departure arose in part because of the band’s strong desire to again work with Rudd. Recorded at the Ocean Way Studios in Los Angeles by the reunited 1980–83 line-up and produced by Rick Rubin, Ballbreaker was released in 1995. The first single from the album was “Hard as a Rock”. Two more singles were released from the album: “Hail Caesar” and “Cover You in Oil”.
In 1997, a box set named Bonfire was released. It contained four albums; a remastered version of Back in Black; Volts (a disc with alternate takes, outtakes, and stray live cuts) and two live albums, Live from the Atlantic Studios and Let There Be Rock: The Movie. Live from the Atlantic Studios was recorded on 7 December 1977 at the Atlantic Studios in New York. Let There Be Rock: The Movie was a double album recorded in 1979 at the Pavillon de Paris and was the soundtrack of a motion picture, AC/DC: Let There Be Rock. The US version of the box set included a colour booklet, a two-sided poster, a sticker, a temporary tattoo, a keychain bottle opener, and a guitar pick.[59]
Angus Young performs in Cologne, Germany in 2001 during the Stiff Upper Lip Tour

In 2000, the band released Stiff Upper Lip, produced by brother George Young at the Warehouse Studio, again in Vancouver. The album was better received by critics than Ballbreaker but was considered lacking in new ideas.[60][61] The Australian release included a bonus disc with three promotional videos and several live performances recorded in Madrid, Spain in 1996. Stiff Upper Lip reached No.1 in five countries, including Argentina and Germany; No.2 in three countries, Spain, France and Switzerland; No.3 in Australia; No.5 in Canada and Portugal; and No.7 in Norway, the US and Hungary. The first single, “Stiff Upper Lip”, remained at No.1 on the US Mainstream Rock charts for four weeks.[27] The other singles released also did very well; “Satellite Blues” and “Safe in New York City” reached No.7 and No.31 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock Tracks, respectively.

In 2002, AC/DC signed a long-term, multi-album deal with Sony Music,[62] who went on to release a series of remastered albums as part of their AC/DC remasters series. Each release contained an expanded booklet featuring rare photographs, memorabilia, and notes.[63] In 2003, the entire back-catalogue (except Ballbreaker and Stiff Upper Lip) was remastered and re-released. Ballbreaker was eventually re-released in October 2005; Stiff Upper Lip was later re-released in April 2007. Also in 2003, the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

On 30 July 2003, the band performed with the Rolling Stones and Rush at Molson Canadian Rocks for Toronto. The concert, held before an audience of half a million, was intended to help the city overcome the negative publicity stemming from the effects of a 2003 SARS epidemic. The concert holds the record for the largest paid music event in North American history.[64] The band came second in a list of Australia’s highest-earning entertainers for 2005,[65] and sixth for 2006,[66] despite having neither toured since 2003 nor released an album since 2000. Verizon Wireless has gained the rights to release AC/DC’s full albums and the entire Live at Donington concert to download in 2008.[67]

On 16 October 2007, Columbia Records released a double and triple DVD titled Plug Me In. The set consists of five and seven hours of rare footage, and even a recording of AC/DC at a high school performing “School Days”, “T.N.T.”, “She’s Got Balls”, and “It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll)”. As with Family Jewels, disc one contains rare shows of the band with Bon Scott, and disc two is about the Brian Johnson era. The collector’s edition contains an extra DVD with 21 more rare performances of both Scott and Johnson and more interviews.[68]

AC/DC made their video game debut on Rock Band 2, with “Let There Be Rock” included as a playable track.[69] The setlist from their Live at Donington live album was released as playable songs for the Rock Band series by means of a Wal-Mart-exclusive retail disc titled AC/DC Live: Rock Band Track Pack.[70]

No Bull: The Directors Cut, a newly edited, comprehensive Blu-ray and DVD of the band’s July 1996 Plaza De Toros de las Ventas concert in Madrid, Spain, was released on 9 September 2008.[71]
Black Ice (2008–11)
AC/DC performs at Rogers Centre in Toronto on 7 November 2008 during their Black Ice World Tour

“Rock ‘n’ Roll Train”
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Sample of Black Ice’s lead single “Rock ‘n’ Roll Train”. The song is centred around guitar riffs and elemental drum beats,[72] and features harmonic backing vocals during the chorus.[73]
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On 18 August 2008, Columbia Records announced 18 October Australian release, and 20 October worldwide release, of the studio album Black Ice. The 15-track album was the band’s first studio release in eight years, was produced by Brendan O’Brien and was mixed and engineered by Mike Fraser. Like Stiff Upper Lip, it was recorded at The Warehouse Studio in Vancouver, British Columbia. Black Ice was sold in the US exclusively at Walmart and Sam’s Club and the band’s official website.[74]

“Rock ‘n’ Roll Train”, the album’s first single, was released to radio on 28 August. On 15 August, AC/DC recorded a video for a song from the new album in London with a special selection of fans getting the chance to be in the video.[75] Black Ice made history debuting at No.1 on album charts in 29 countries and also has the distinction of being Columbia Records’ biggest debut album (since Nielsen SoundScan began tracking sales data for Billboard in March 1991). Black Ice has been certified Multi Platinum in eight countries, including the US, Australia, Canada, Switzerland, Sweden, Norway, Germany and the Czech Republic. Additionally Black Ice has achieved Platinum status in twelve countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, UK, Argentina, Singapore and New Zealand) and Gold status in four countries (The Netherlands, Spain, Poland and Brazil). With over 6.5 million copies of Black Ice shipped worldwide, combined with over 5.5 million in catalogue sold, AC/DC have surpassed The Beatles as the No.1 selling catalogue artist in the US for 2008. The 18-month Black Ice World Tour supporting the new album was announced on 11 September and began on 28 October in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.[76]

On 15 September 2008, AC/DC Radio debuted on Sirius Channel 19 and XM channel 53. The channel plays AC/DC music along with interviews with the band members.[77]
Angus Young on 18 June 2010 at the Stade de France (Paris).

With the North American release of Black Ice on 20 October 2008, Columbia Records and Walmart created “Rock Again AC/DC Stores” to promote the album. In October 2008, MTV, Walmart, and Columbia created “AC/DC Rock Band Stores” in New York City, at Times Square, and in Los Angeles. “Black Ice” trucks were also dispatched on the streets of these two cities after the release, playing AC/DC music aloud and making various stops each day to sell merchandise.[78]

In late September 2009, the band rescheduled six shows when Brian Johnson underwent an operation for ulcers.[79] On 29 September, the band announced a collection of studio and live rarities, Backtracks, which was released on 10 November 2009 as a 3-CD/2-DVD/1-LP box-set.[80]

On 4 November AC/DC were announced as the Business Review Weekly top Australian earner (entertainment) for 2009 with earnings of $105 million. This displaced The Wiggles from the number one spot for the first time in four years.[81]

On 19 April 2010, AC/DC released Iron Man 2, the soundtrack for the eponymous film.[82] One month later, the band headlined Download Festival at Donington Park,[83] and closed the Black Ice World Tour in Bilbao, Spain on 28 June 2010, after 20 months in which AC/DC went to 108 cities in over 28 countries, with an estimated audience of over five million people.[84] Three concerts in December 2009 at the River Plate Stadium in Argentina were released as the DVD Live at River Plate on 10 May 2011.[85] An exclusive single from the DVD, featuring the songs “Shoot to Thrill” and “War Machine”, was issued on Record Store Day.[86] In 2011, the band also issued on DVD and Blu-ray the concert movie AC/DC: Let There Be Rock, which had its theatrical release in 1980.[87]
Rock or Bust, 40th anniversary tour, departure of Malcolm Young (2011–present)

Angus stated in an interview in early May 2011 that the band was beginning to plan another world tour, saying, “Now we’re thinking, ‘How can we ever better the ‘Black Ice’ world tour?’ But we will.”[88] At the band’s Live at River Plate DVD premiere on 6 May 2011 at the Hammersmith Apollo in London, England, Angus said that there were plans for the group to release a new studio album “within the next couple of years”, which the tour would support.[89] Also, AC/DC’s 40th anniversary will be marked for 2013. Most recently, Brian Johnson was a guest on VH1 Classic’s “That Metal Show” saying the band would get back in the studio and release an album in early to mid-2013. Later, Johnson called in to “The Cowhead Show” and reported that the next album has been delayed due to a health issue with one of the band members. He stated that an illness suffered by one of his bandmates may have temporarily put plans for a new album on hold. He would not go into specifics about which member or what the illness was, but he did say it was not terminal and that the afflicted member was on the path to recovery.

In May 2012, Malcolm Young confirmed that the band are working on a potential follow-up to 2008’s Black Ice. But he warned that fans are in for a longer wait than expected, after lead singer Brian Johnson suggested there would be new material next year. Malcolm stated, “You know what Brian’s like. He just says things and then walks away. It’ll be a little while – a year or two anyway. I’ve been doing some jamming on some song ideas but I do that all the time, as do the rest of the band. We are still working. But we had a long rest between Stiff Upper Lip and Black Ice, so I think we need a couple of years to recuperate and work on it a bit more.”[90]

On 19 November 2012, AC/DC released Live at River Plate,[91] their first live album in 20 years.

In April 2013, Aerosmith front man, Steven Tyler stated he wants to tour with AC/DC and is willing to take a pay cut for this to happen.[92]

On 16 April 2014, in response to earlier reports that the band may be retiring due to Malcolm Young being seriously ill and unable to perform,[93] Brian Johnson commented that AC/DC are not retiring, stating “We are definitely getting together in May in Vancouver. We’re going to pick up guitars, have a plonk and see if anybody has got any tunes or ideas. If anything happens we’ll record it.”[94] AC/DC subsequently announced in an official statement on their Facebook page that Malcolm Young would be taking a break from the band due to his ill health. It ended: “The band will continue to make music.”[95] In June, Johnson announced that AC/DC are “very likely” to be on the road again before the end of 2014.[96] In July 2014, AC/DC confirmed that they have finished recording their next album and that Malcolm’s nephew, Stevie Young replaced Malcolm in the studio.[97]

Drummer Phil Rudd released his first solo album, Head Job, on 29 August 2014. He confirmed that there would be another AC/DC tour, and stated that the band had no intention of retiring, adding, “We’ll all have to be dead before it stops.”[98]

On 23 September 2014, Alberts management confirmed that founding member Malcolm Young had officially departed from the band and revealed that their new record entitled Rock or Bust featuring eleven new tracks will be released on 28 November 2014 as the first AC/DC album in the band’s history without Malcolm Young on the recordings.[1] The band also announced plans for a world tour to promote the new album with Malcolm and Angus’ nephew Stevie Young as Malcolm’s replacement.[99]
Legacy
The street sign for ACDC Lane, Melbourne

AC/DC were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on 10 March 2003.[100] During the ceremony the band performed “Highway to Hell” and “You Shook Me All Night Long”, with guest vocals provided by host Steven Tyler of Aerosmith. He described the band’s power chords as “the thunder from down under that gives you the second most powerful surge that can flow through your body.”[101] During the acceptance speech, Brian Johnson quoted their 1977 song “Let There Be Rock”.[102]

On 22 March 2000, the municipality of Leganés (near Madrid) named a street in honour of the band as “Calle de AC/DC” (“AC/DC Street”). Malcolm and Angus assisted in the inauguration with many fans. Later that day, the plaque with the name of the group was stolen, perhaps by an enthusiast or collector. The plaque was replaced two hours later, and stolen once again a mere three days after the fact. The plaque had since been stolen numerous times, forcing the municipality of Leganés to begin selling replicas of the official street plaque.

In May 2003, Malcolm Young accepted a Ted Albert Award for Outstanding Service to Australian Music at the 2003 Music Winners Awards, during which he paid special tribute to Bon Scott.[103]

On 1 October 2004, a central Melbourne thoroughfare, Corporation Lane, was renamed ACDC Lane in honour of the band. However, the City of Melbourne forbade the use of the slash character in street names, so the four letters were combined.[104] The lane is near Swanston Street where, on the back of a truck, the band recorded their video for the 1975 hit “It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll)”.[28]

They sold over 1.3 million CDs in the US during 2007 despite not having released a new album since 2000 at that point. Additionally, the group’s commercial success continues to flourish despite their choice to refrain from selling albums in digital online formats for many years.[105] However, in November 2012, the entire catalogue (excluding the T.N.T. album and the Australian versions of the High Voltage, Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap and Let There Be Rock albums) became available on the iTunes Store.[106]

In 2009 the Recording Industry Association of America upgraded the group’s US sales figures from 69 million to 71 million, making AC/DC the fifth-best-selling band in US history and the tenth-best-selling artist, selling more albums than Madonna and Mariah Carey.[7] The RIAA also certified Back in Black as double Diamond (20 million) in US sales, and by 2007 the album had sold 22 million copies, which made it the fifth-best-selling album of all-time in the US.[10] It is currently the second-best-selling album worldwide.
Band members
Main article: List of AC/DC band members

Current members

Angus Young – lead guitar (1973–present)
Phil Rudd – drums (1975–1983, 1994–present)
Cliff Williams – bass guitar, backing vocals (1977–present)
Brian Johnson – lead vocals (1980–present)
Stevie Young – rhythm guitar, backing vocals (1988, 2014–)

Former members

Malcolm Young – rhythm guitar, backing vocals (1973–2014)
Dave Evans – lead vocals (1973–1974)
Bon Scott – lead vocals (1974–1980)
Mark Evans – bass guitar (1975–1977)
Simon Wright – drums (1983–1989)
Chris Slade – drums (1989–1994)

Note: Before their debut album, High Voltage (1975), AC/DC had several line up changes. For a more comprehensive list of members that were part of the band before 1975, see List of AC/DC band members.acdc

Gary Moore – Still Got The Blues (Live)


Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952 – 6 February 2011), was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist.

In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians.
Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of a promoter named Bobby and housewife, Winnie. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.

Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed.

Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore’s greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green’s continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green’s 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green’s request, so that “it would have a good home”. Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music.
Changing bands

In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan “Brush” Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.gary moore

In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the moniker “The Gary Moore Band” he released his first solo album in 1973, Grinding Stone . “Grinding Stone” was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker’s fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received “Album of the Year” accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington in 1974.

In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell.

From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer’s Variations album in 1978.

In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later.
Solo career

In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore’s blues-based guitar and Lynott’s voice produced “Parisienne Walkways”, which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for “Waiting for an Alibi” and “Do Anything You Want To”.
Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985

He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock and heavy metal.[5]

In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles’ “Let It Be”. which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on “She’s My Baby” from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3.
Moore performing, 23 October 2010

After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood’s 2000 album, You’ll Love to Hate This.

With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007) and Bad For You Baby (2008).

In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore. The song, entitled “Grief Never Grows Old”, was released in February 2005, reaching No. 4 on the UK Singles Chart.[6]

He also took part in a comedy skit entitled “The Easy Guitar Book Sketch” with comedian Rowland Rivron and fellow musicians Mark Knopfler, Lemmy from Motörhead, Mark King from Level 42, and David Gilmour.[citation needed]

Other collaborations included a broad range of artists including Trilok Gurtu, Dr. Strangely Strange, Jimmy Nail, Mo Foster, Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce, Jim Capaldi, B.B. King, Vicki Brown, Cozy Powell, Rod Argent, the Beach Boys, Paul Rodgers, Keith Emerson, Roger Daltrey, and Otis Taylor (musician).
Personal life

In 2002, he bought a five-bedroom detached Edwardian house in Hove, just west of Brighton, Sussex, to be near his sons, Jack and Gus, from his former marriage, which had lasted from 1985 to 1993. Since 1997, he was living with his partner, an artist named Jo, and their daughter Lily (b. 1999). His daughter Saoirse, was born from an earlier relationship while he was with Skid Row. His residence was reported to be on Vallance Gardens in Hove, East Sussex.
Death

Gary Moore died of a heart attack in his sleep at the age of 58 during the early hours of 6 February 2011. At the time, he was on holiday with a girlfriend at the Kempinski Hotel in Estepona, Spain. After a quiet dinner, they went for a walk on the beach before going up to their room. His girlfriend raised the alarm at 4:00 am, and tried to give him a heart massage. His death was confirmed by Thin Lizzy’s manager Adam Parsons.

Moore was laid to rest in St Margaret’s Churchyard, Rottingdean, East Sussex, England, in a private ceremony, with only the family and close friends in attendance.
Legacy

While less successful in the US, Moore was popular in Europe. Throughout his career, Moore was recognised as an influence by many notable guitarists including Martin Barre,Vivian Campbell, Patrick Rondat, John Norum, Paul Gilbert, Gus G, Slash, Orianthi, Joe Bonamassa, Adrian Smith, Doug Aldrich, Zakk Wylde, Randy Rhoads, John Sykes and Kirk Hammett.

Since his death, many fellow musicians have commented on Gary Moore’s talents including Ozzy Osbourne, Kirk Hammett,Eric Singer, Doug Aldrich, Tony Iommi,Bob Geldof, Roger Taylor, Brian May, Brian Downey, Andy DiGelsomina, Ricky Warwick,Glenn Hughes, Bryan Adams, Henry Rollins, Scott Gorham,Ignacio Garay,and Mikael Åkerfeldt.On 18 April 2011, a number of musicians including Eric Bell and Brian Downey, Thunder rising, Silverbird and The Business blues band gathered for a tribute concert in Whelan’s bar in Dublin, Ireland titled ‘The Gig For Gary’.

In March 2011 Guitarist produced a tribute special with unreleased footage from 2009. Twitter was flooded with tributes from fans for several days after his death.

A large statue of Moore was erected on a small island outside Skånevik, following his many performances at the Skånevik Blues Festival. The statue still stands as of July 2013.